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Can eggs help IBD?

I believe eggs may have played a role in the suppression of my disease for a short period of time before being diagnosed and I wanted to look at the existing science to see if there was a known effect on colitis. Here is what I found.

Substances found in eggs tested in rat models of colitis-
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21733301
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25602920
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19231858

in humans with UC-
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14621278


In sweden there is an egg yolk prescription treatment for IBD that is actually now available without a prescription since 2010. Its called Salovum. This company also makes another product that is some sort of sprouted oat and wheat cereal which is also used to treat IBD.
http://www.as-faktor.se/en/Medical-Food/Salovum/
http://www.as-faktor.se/Global/ASFaktor/Produktbilder/Patientfall2engelsk.pdf


Id say that's enough evidence to try and add eggs to your diet and see if it effects your symptoms in any positive way. But its not just the yolks, the egg whites have antibacterial properties too(ovotransferrin and lysozyme is in whites), and some peptides combine with the yolk and they avoid being broken down further in the GI tract and retain unique properties, so eat the whole egg. In one study of ovotransferrin you would need 6 egg whites to replicate the dosage in humans, so that's a good place to start to conduct and experiment.
 
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Cross-stitch gal

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Vancouver,
I don't know about eggs helping with IBD. But, I do fine with eggs. However, we have our own chickens in our backyard and get fresh ones everyday. So, we know pretty much everything that our chickens eat (except when they're fed from both sides of the fence because of our neighbors helping out with their cuttings).
 

nogutsnoglory

Moderator
Eggs are a nice way to get safe protein and lots of nutrients. I do find they make my stool loose though but maybe it's due to the oil. I think I'm fine with hard boiled.
 
I eat a hard boiled egg for lunch daily and have for several years mainly because I like them. They never seem to give me problems. Now, a fried egg on a hamburger, man is that good, but I get a big bloat from that.
 
From what I've researched, the avidin/biotin issue with raw egg white is blown out of proportion. Sure, egg whites might bind onto biotin, but the egg yolk is one of the greatest sources of biotin so it shouldn't be a problem so long as you also eat the yolk.

Here's an article that makes me less fearful of raw egg whites- http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2005/02/09/raw-eggs.aspx

And there must be something to raw eggs- fifth? oldest person in the world (lady from Europe) has been eating 3 raw eggs/ day since she was a teenager.
 
From what I've researched, the avidin/biotin issue with raw egg white is blown out of proportion. Sure, egg whites might bind onto biotin, but the egg yolk is one of the greatest sources of biotin so it shouldn't be a problem so long as you also eat the yolk.

Here's an article that makes me less fearful of raw egg whites- http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2005/02/09/raw-eggs.aspx

And there must be something to raw eggs- fifth? oldest person in the world (lady from Europe) has been eating 3 raw eggs/ day since she was a teenager.
raw eggs=longevity??ahhh, doesn't prove causation though. Interesting observation though. The proteins are heat stable though so they don't change when heated, heating helps ensure pathogenic bacteria die.
 
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