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Causes of Crohns any guess

Hi all,

As everyone aware no doctor has an idea about Crohn’s disease causes but as from my experience I am sharing my thoughts. I usually don’t drink milk and also in India we drink buffalo milk. Here people don’t give steroids to buffalos to get more milk like in western countries(please don’t take me wrong). I moved to USA in 2013 and in 2016 due to my job rush hours I took corn flakes with milk for three months and one day we had a barbecue with chicken and hot sausage that’s where I started to have diarrhea, weight loss, cough, chills etc. So finally I was diagnosed with Crohns in 2016. So here I suspect either cow milk or spices like hot sauce caused me to have this disease. Other than that I don’t see any other cause in my case.

initially I used to think because of meat consumption inflammation came but I also found out pure vegetarians also getting this disease so meat is not the culprit here.

Things may change from person to person. Please share your experience and thoughts.
Thanks in advance
 
Good day, my son has never consumed cow's milk and he has never eaten meat - we have no family history, but he has crohn's. Food does not cause crohn's. In fact, it is still not know what causes crohn's.
 
I believe it starts with a dysfunctional immune system. What causes the dysfunction I do not yet know. Since what causes the immune system problem is unknown to me, I guess whatever it is would be the root cause of the disease. It could be more than one thing.

Dan
 
There have been studies like this in the past which I have linked.

But a recent study has confirmed, again, that antibodies against E coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae can predict who will develop crohn's disease with very high accuracy 5 years in advance. (these tests (anti-OMPC and ASCA) do not work for UC at all, UC has nothing to do with crohn's)

Serum Biomarkers Identify Patients Who Will Develop Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Up to 5 y Before Diagnosis.

Here is another such study.

Serological markers predict inflammatory bowel disease years before the diagnosis.

We can predict who will develop crohn's disease by identifying antibodies against E Coli.

Crohn's is caused by pathogens (such as E Coli, AIEC) chronically invading intestinal tissue, exacerbated by the fecal stream. An inadequate primary immune response of macrophages fails to clear those pathogens, which results in chronic inflammation.

Any diet that helps has a high bioavailability and low residue, which subsequently lowers the fecal stream. EN consists of a specific maltodextrin with a high DE that is comparable to dextrose, small intestinal uptake happens before most of the content reaches the ileum. This lowers bacterial load and lowers bacterial entry into intestinal tissue.
 
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The question as to what the actual initial trigger is, is a different question I feel. But it's an academic question, it doesn't matter to a patient or impacts treatment.

Those people with antibodies against E Coli and Saccharomyces are far more likely to develop crohn. But why don't hey have crohn's yet at that point, there is a high potential they get sick, but what is the actual trigger that causes the acute disease. They can have no symptoms for years even though they carry all the pathogens and all the serum diagnostic tools like anti-OMPC and ASCA are positive. What tips the scale, how do they go from high disease potential to actual disease.

One suggestion has been a foodborne infection (salmonella, campylobacter, etc), these infections are extremely common in the West. This infection is cleared but it leaves a permeable intestine behind that allows E Coli and Saccharomyces chronic entry into the intestine.

For patients it doesn't really matter what the initial trigger was, by the time people are diagnosed with the disease that foodborne infection has long been cleared and won't show up anymore in tests. What does matter is the chronic immune response against E Coli, Saccharomyces, and other pathogens from the fecal stream that are entering tissue.
 
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Just to reiterate that Crohn's is extremely different from UC. It is a real shame the umbrella term IBD exists, a term you won't see me use because of this reason.

Those ASCA antibodies I mentioned are specific to crohn's you can not find them in UC patients. You can not diagnose, predict, or find the cause of UC by looking at crohn's disease antibodies.

There is no sort of overlap between UC and crohn's. They are completely different diseases.

ASCA antibodies are specific to crohn's disease, you can not find them in UC patients. anti-CBir (response to flagellin of E Coli) is found in crohn's disease, you can not find them in UC patient. AIEC (E coli) is found in crohn's disease, you can not find them in UC patients. Granuloma response to intracellular bacteria are specific to crohn's disease, you can not find them in UC patients. Autophagy defficiencies (ATG16L1) that allow those bacteria to circumvent clearance by macrophages is crohn's disease specific, you can not find them in UC patients.
 
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The reason why I asked is one of my friend’s mom came to USA and she became sick and got Crohns during her short visit. She never had any symptoms before and she was so healthy. Moreover she is 60+ age. There should be some food which triggered Crohn’s disease. Even In my early diagnosis my doctor suspected it could be TB because Crohns is very less in Asian people but unfortunately it came out as Crohn’s. I am just trying to figure out the cause. Thank you all..
 
There have been studies like this in the past which I have linked.

But a recent study has confirmed, again, that antibodies against E coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae can predict who will develop crohn's disease with very high accuracy 5 years in advance. (these tests (anti-OMPC and ASCA) do not work for UC at all, UC has nothing to do with crohn's)

Serum Biomarkers Identify Patients Who Will Develop Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Up to 5 y Before Diagnosis.

Here is another such study.

Serological markers predict inflammatory bowel disease years before the diagnosis.

We can predict who will develop crohn's disease by identifying antibodies against E Coli.

Crohn's is caused by pathogens (such as E Coli, AIEC) chronically invading intestinal tissue, exacerbated by the fecal stream. An inadequate primary immune response of macrophages fails to clear those pathogens, which results in chronic inflammation.

Any diet that helps has a high bioavailability and low residue, which subsequently lowers the fecal stream. EN consists of a specific maltodextrin with a high DE that is comparable to dextrose, small intestinal uptake happens before most of the content reaches the ileum. This lowers bacterial load and lowers bacterial entry into intestinal tissue.
Hi Kiny,

thanks for your response useful data. Good to know that we can detect crohns ahead.
 
As already mentioned in this thread, I believe it is just simply a malfunction of the immune system. I developed the symptoms of Crohns at the same time I started having issues with Allergic Rhinitis. I also developed eczema on my thigh at the same time. This essentially started in Iraq BUT I don't believe it's tied to that because my allergies started to become present right beforehand (I just settled into Texas before deployment). I think our bodies just flip out when there's some form of allergen it doesn't like.
 
I agree with you. I was a very healthy female til, 40. No IBS, diarrhea, constipation ever in my life. Suddenly in December 2018 i had severe bloating after eating outside. Initially GP gave me pravacid thinking its acid indigestion. It didn’t help. Endoscopy last year showed nothing. Colonoscopy June 2019 and Aug2019 showed ulcers in terminal ileum but no crohns in biopsy. Wasn’t given any medication . But kept loosing weight and horrible gas and bloating. I switched to another GI. They did endoscopy which shows some early IBD changes. Colonoscopy march, 2020 showed normal terminal ileum but biopsy now shows chronic active ileitis. Capsule endoscopy showed many ulcers in small intestine. I am feeling so devastated and still unable to accept the fact that a healthy person with no symptoms ever is sick with an incurable disease like crohns. Totally depressed. I look at my husband and kids and feel so sorry for them that i will never be that happy, healthy mother and wife that I used to be. They haven’t done anything wrong to deserve this.
 
The funny thing with me is that I'm not losing weight (unfortunately). With the amount of steroids I've been prescribed for the sinus and skin issues, I've actually gained weight over the past 6 years. Not in a good way.
 
Just to reiterate that Crohn's is extremely different from UC. It is a real shame the umbrella term IBD exists, a term you won't see me use because of this reason.

Those ASCA antibodies I mentioned are specific to crohn's you can not find them in UC patients. You can not diagnose, predict, or find the cause of UC by looking at crohn's disease antibodies.

There is no sort of overlap between UC and crohn's. They are completely different diseases.

ASCA antibodies are specific to crohn's disease, you can not find them in UC patients. anti-CBir (response to flagellin of E Coli) is found in crohn's disease, you can not find them in UC patient. AIEC (E coli) is found in crohn's disease, you can not find them in UC patients. Granuloma response to intracellular bacteria are specific to crohn's disease, you can not find them in UC patients. Autophagy defficiencies (ATG16L1) that allow those bacteria to circumvent clearance by macrophages is crohn's disease specific, you can not find them in UC patients.
My prognosis, after severe illness, hospitalisation and several incursions into my colon was that of Crohn's Colitis. I take Azathioprene and Pentasa, initially coming out of hospital on Prednisolone as well, which was tapered out over a six week period. I actually cannot grasp the concept of people being advised to eat five lots of fruit and five lots of veg per day, as the amount of fibre must be way too much for the guts too handle.
 
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