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Cdn provincial government policy that would require a switch from biologic to biosimilar

Tesscorm

Moderator
Staff member
I received the following message from Crohns & Colitis Canada. I thought it was worth passing along to Canadian members. It's enough that insurance companies already have a say in medical decisions that affect IBD patients; our government should not be further limiting our options!​

The link at the bottom should take you to Crohns & Colitis Canada site where you can participate in asking the government to not force a change from a biologic to a biosimilar when it is contrary to the decision made by the patient and their doctor.

Treatment decisions should be made by you and your doctor - not the government.

Provincial governments are considering or have implemented changes to healthcare policy that would require Canadians living with Crohn's or colitis who are currently doing well on a biologic to switch to a biosimilar. This means that if you are currently on a biologic, you may have to change your treatment plan - not because it is the best course of action for your unique IBD experience, but for non-medical reasons.

As British Columbia implements their non-medical switching policy, other governments will look to the patient response. We strongly disagree with policy changes at the expense of your health, so we launched a letter-writing campaign to amplify the voices of our community and let governments know that we do not support non-medical switching policy.

Your participation in this campaign is crucial!
The more noise we make, the more likely provincial governments will reconsider implementing a non-medical switch.

Take part in our letter-writing campaign to let your provincial government know how you feel! All you have to do is enter your name, email, and postal code - we'll take care of the rest.


 

my little penguin

Moderator
Staff member
Oh no !
In the US at least (for now - this will probably change)
Only patients who have not been on a biologic are to start on the biosimilars .
If your on a biologics so far they are not requiring patients to switch just yet .
 

Tesscorm

Moderator
Staff member
I asked on the Parents' thread as well but do you know if you run the risk of developing antibodies if you switch to a biosimilar but then want to switch back (ie if biosimilar isn't working well for you)?
 

my little penguin

Moderator
Staff member
 

my little penguin

Moderator
Staff member
These findings suggest that patients on branded infliximab should not be switched to the biosimilar, because cross-reactivity will increase the clearance of the biosimilar, potentially compromising therapeutic response and heightening the risk of infusion-related reactions,” stated Daniel Nagore, PhD, co-investigator of the study and an employee of Progenika-Grifols in Derio, Spain.

“Patients who develop antibodies on the reference product infliximab should be switched to a different biologic.… Gastroenterologists already monitor for antibodies in patients on biologics,” he added. “This study provides one more argument for therapeutic monitoring in rheumatic diseases.”

Infliximab is an anti–tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agent approved for the treatment of RA, SpA, plaque psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. CT-P13, the first anti–TNF-α biosimilar, was approved for the same indications as infliximab by the European Medicines Agency in 2013, and by the FDA earlier in 2016.
From
 

Tesscorm

Moderator
Staff member
Thanks for all the links MLP! (Just got a chance to read through them.)

So it doesn't seem that developing antibodies to the biologic is common after switching to the biosimilar - which is good news. :) Although, I'd still prefer to not rock the boat when things are working.

I'm going to speak to S's liaison nurse about this issue. One of the articles brought up the possibility of patients being switched without prior warning, I'd like to know what S's GI's policy is regarding this (if there's even a policy in place yet??). I don't think his IBD clinic would make the switch without advising the patient but, IDK?? I'd like to know if the switch is happening, even if I can't stop it... but, by knowing S has been switched, I'd know to watch for any changes.

Also, would S's GI even be told?? I would hope so but, when I fill a typical prescription, if I'm given a generic version, prior approval isn't requested by my family dr.

Thanks again for the links!
 
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