• Welcome to Crohn's Forum, a support group for people with all forms of IBD. While this community is not a substitute for doctor's advice and we cannot treat or diagnose, we find being able to communicate with others who have IBD is invaluable as we navigate our struggles and celebrate our successes. We invite you to join us.

Dr. Armstrong: Unfermented β-fructan Fibers Fuel Inflammation in Select Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients

trying to see what im understanding here....

seems like its maybe pointing to a couple possible things....

fructose? the nasty fodmap etc...i was already partly trying to avoid...even tho some these diets LOVE apples.
cruciferous stuff......same category i have been avoiding.........it gets more complicated for me around here tho....

so its saying "unfermented".....which is whats supposed to be happening in the gut.....so perhaps it is saying if ones gut "cannot" ferment it, then it becomes problematic......or you can sort of read it like these fibers naturally resist fermentation but bacterias feed on gas so a little is good etc, but since my surgery im not feeling very welcome about any gas at all because i can feel the bubbles more for one thing....

then they gotta throw in the "some IBD patients" and im wondering did any data survive the details/disclaimers?

its more support tho i guess? for the idea that fodmaps and cruciforms are bad for "some" IBD ppl?

its nice at least to have a list, i wanna see all this stuff on a chart.....like every food item and how it rates against diff theories......then how concrete each theory is and where its weaknesses lie etc......scattered data makes my brain feel similar.
 
trying to see what im understanding here....

seems like its maybe pointing to a couple possible things....

fructose? the nasty fodmap etc...i was already partly trying to avoid...even tho some these diets LOVE apples.
cruciferous stuff......same category i have been avoiding.........it gets more complicated for me around here tho....

so its saying "unfermented".....which is whats supposed to be happening in the gut.....so perhaps it is saying if ones gut "cannot" ferment it, then it becomes problematic......or you can sort of read it like these fibers naturally resist fermentation but bacterias feed on gas so a little is good etc, but since my surgery im not feeling very welcome about any gas at all because i can feel the bubbles more for one thing....

then they gotta throw in the "some IBD patients" and im wondering did any data survive the details/disclaimers?

its more support tho i guess? for the idea that fodmaps and cruciforms are bad for "some" IBD ppl?

its nice at least to have a list, i wanna see all this stuff on a chart.....like every food item and how it rates against diff theories......then how concrete each theory is and where its weaknesses lie etc......scattered data makes my brain feel similar.
People were following her thread asking if probiotics or fermented foods would help and her answer was no and she said that this finding is not general enough (yet) to be applied clinically. However her calling out fibers for the Crohn's patients is helpful because the field generally thinks that fibers are all around good so consume them all and often.
 
idk.......when i got out of surgery much of what i heard was low residue, low fiber.....to the point of the worst hemorrhoids ive had in my life...

im now rushing like crazy back for fiber but still afraid of most foods....or even the logics behind the science in most foods...

i think saying fermentation is bad for us could be quite detrimental.....as we are having issues absorbing things i think fermentation could actually be a vital tool......honestly.....even in regards to fermenting supplements, which i was talking with someone about a couple weeks ago...its like an external stomach, why should we throw that away so quickly?

probiotics tho is another story.....i am agreeing more with that guy you linked last month saying we should be introducing and encouraging native species instead....im still not convinced about sac.B tho....i still take a little of that one sometimes because it is sort of said to be more about kicking out bad bacterias than colonizing cultures and such like others.

it sort of only confuses me more tho your reply lol......if the study says unfermented is bad, i would think she should be encouraging people to ferment...

interesting anyway, thanks for posting as usual :)
 
one specific example just came to mind as im making my daily smoothie here.....

ive just switched to "fermented cacao".....as i noticed it existed.....i figure thats better than the low cadmium i was using and taste isnt too different so im planning to stick with this new stuff...
 
Related tweet:
Butyrate-producing bacteria is associated with high trough biologics level.

Also see:

 
my instinct was leaning that way.....good quality time release tributryin is one of my supplements i get itchy if i get low on....
im still sort of taking blind stabs at things but that....i mean this brand slogan is literally "heal the system, not the symptom"...
anyway, lol, that sort of leaky gut treatments and this butyrate type data.....its why i keep taking epicor too even tho prebiotics can get sort of shrugged.....i wouldnt want to try relying on solely those, but they can seem to fit in....

i mean even that same guy i heard in your video that shrugged them at the same time basically admitted they were useful because he said it makes more sense to feed local colonies and that is what they generally do.....its all about context i guess....which senses all these things are true....and to which extent they can be relied on...

you never know what can push the tipping point, i keep trying to see things from all the angles that make sense coming together.
 
thanks for the mention!

Another thing I suspect with processed dietary fibers is that pathogens can more easily utilize it when it has been separated from the whole plant, as many other plant chemicals incorporated into the plant act as an antimicrobial or in other words a deterrent to pathogens, and the fiber component isn't available until the surrounding other carbohydrates are digested in the small intestine. So its almost always healthier to get fiber from whole plant foods. This might be how the fiber like inulin can create inflammation in some patients, as our microbiomes aren't all exactly the same, and IBD patients microbiomes are the most chaotic and unstable.

And like I mentioned earlier, some fibers are just not tolerated at all in IBD patients, and that's really not my idea, but I have found it to be true.
 
Last edited:
Top