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Inulin in probiotics

Hi all!
I have a question about probiotics: most seem to contain a prebiotic, either inulin or maltodextrin. I definitely want to avoid those containing maltodextrin after reading articles posted here that it creates a biofilm that pathogenic bacteria are able to use as a shield to protect themselves. Does anyone know whether inulin produces the same effect? Or if its harmful in some other way?
I appreciate any pointers on this topic.
:)
 
Prebiotics are really essential when it comes to probiotics really. Prebiotics help stimulate the growth of good gut flora. But I agree, I dont like malodextrin at all and it seems to be an ingrediant in a lot of stuff...

I have used many different probiotics over the years. One that I have been using for the last three to four years is one by renew life called 50 billion. It does contain vegetable cellulose as an inactive ingredient though. I have been looking at different ones and they all seem to contain vegetable cellulose. You could also look into drinking kefir if you can tolerate dairy as that has a lot of probitoics in it as well..








Hi all!
I have a question about probiotics: most seem to contain a prebiotic, either inulin or maltodextrin. I definitely want to avoid those containing maltodextrin after reading articles posted here that it creates a biofilm that pathogenic bacteria are able to use as a shield to protect themselves. Does anyone know whether inulin produces the same effect? Or if its harmful in some other way?
I appreciate any pointers on this topic.
:)
 
i have had positive and negative experiances with inulin, it all depends on what type of bacteria are living in your intestines at the time, they seem to change from time to time, we have a tendancy to accumulate them in our guts from the surrounding environment, the negative pathogens are higher then in a normal intestine, some can grow quite well off fiber.
 
Thank you Wild bill! Are there any particular brands of probiotics you have had success with?... I assume its not possible to get a probiotic without ANY prebiotic in it, as then presumably the probiotic would die before we even got a chance to take any...
 
Not sure, but I would't just take it and wait until we are sure it isn't harmful. Invasive E Coli have a specific Malx gene to use maltodextrin but they are capable of using other carb to create biofilms too, sucrose doesn't seem to be problematic though.

I have inulin just because I wanted to know what it was, it's an extremely sticky type of carb, much stickier than regular table sugar, it's almost like superglue once it comes into contact with water.

Maltodextrin is a similar substance, it's a sticky type of glue like substance, in fact that's why it's used, it's properties make it an excellent binder and thickener. That's why they put it in soups and stuff. It's an extremely cheap binding agent.

EN has no fiber in it anywhere and people with crohn's disease seem to be doing just fine on it, in fact one of th emechanics behind the beneficial effects of EN is suggested to be it's absence of any fiber. I'm sure prebiotics sell much better if you tell everyone we need to feed those gut bacteria, if it's true or not is another question I think.
 
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Someone in my school actually made a paper aobut it, here is the growth of invasive E coli specific for crohn (AIEC), IN is inulin

The difference with FOS and IN is that FOS breaks down in the proximal colon and inulin in the distal colon.



Melanie Derde
 
Thats really interesting. I mean what is one suppose to do though if all probiotics contain some form of prebiotic? I mean probiotics are essential, especially for people with digestive disorders since their gut flora is already compromised and they tend to be on antibiotics more than that of a healthy individual. I also notice that if I avoid all fiber, then I get horrible constipation issues. I do try and avoid insoluable fibers though as these are the ones that are very hard on the digestive tract. It is so hard finding that right balance..








Someone in my school actually made a paper aobut it, here is the growth of invasive E coli specific for crohn (AIEC), IN is inulin

The difference with FOS and IN is that FOS breaks down in the proximal colon and inulin in the distal colon.



Melanie Derde
 
Thanks Kiny, that's really interesting.
So, in your opinion is it best to avoid taking probiotics altogether then? I have not come accross any that don't have either inulin or maltodextrin or 'microcrystalline cellulose', or other ingredients which presumably keep the friendly bacteria alive until the consumer takes them.

Also I am not sure what the chart you posted shows... it looks to me that inulin is fairly innocent according to the chart, causing less growth of AEIC than the FOS group, but also less growth than the control group. Or did I misunderstand the chart?

I would much rather find a probiotic without ANY prebiotics in them, but this is not likely to be possible. So it really is a dilemma... if taking in the good bacteria means you have to take something really harmful with it, it may well be best to avoid both....
 
The only thing is, if you ever have to be on an antibiotic of any kind, you will need to take probiotics. Also, having crohns or any other digestive disorder leaves your GI tract more vunerable as you do not have the good amounts of gut flora that a healthy person does. So any little thing( illness, stomach bug) can send you off a cliff.

There are some foods that naturally have probiotics in them like sour krout, Tofu, and tempeh ( not sure if you can tolerate these though). Some are high in soy.

Also there are other kinds of probiotics like Saccromyces Boullardii that help to support the gut flora. It is a yeast that is suppose to be healthy to the gut. It actually helps in eliminating Candida from the body.. The one they sell here is called florastor. Just thought I would pass this along.





Thanks Kiny, that's really interesting.
So, in your opinion is it best to avoid taking probiotics altogether then? I have not come accross any that don't have either inulin or maltodextrin or 'microcrystalline cellulose', or other ingredients which presumably keep the friendly bacteria alive until the consumer takes them.

Also I am not sure what the chart you posted shows... it looks to me that inulin is fairly innocent according to the chart, causing less growth of AEIC than the FOS group, but also less growth than the control group. Or did I misunderstand the chart?

I would much rather find a probiotic without ANY prebiotics in them, but this is not likely to be possible. So it really is a dilemma... if taking in the good bacteria means you have to take something really harmful with it, it may well be best to avoid both....
 
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