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Serratia marcescens, a contributor to crohns?

In 2015 I moved into an apartment that had pink biofilm in the bathroom and no matter what, I could not get rid of it. After being in this apartment for 8 months I started having GI issues. Today, after cleaning something that traveled with us on my move, I noticed it was not getting clean, I found that this is a bacteria known as Serratia marcescens or S.marcescens. S.marcescens has been a theory for chrons disease since 2015. After a quick google scholar search, there are many papers on E. Coli, and S.marcescens playing a huge role in Crohn's. Any thoughts?


https://journals.asm.org/doi/full/10.1128/mBio.01250-16
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/04/190403165834.htm
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/gut-fungus-suspected-in-crohn-s-disease/
 
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Science has no idea how people with crohn's disease end up harbouring these bacteria.

We only have theories.

-Zoonosis is one theory, we know pets harbour AIEC. They develop intestinal inflammation just like crohn's disease. Their feces contain AIEC so they can very likely infect humans.

-Persistent oral infection is another, where bacteria in the mouth keep reinfecting the intestine. Some suggested that might be happening with Candida and Klebsiella. The mount serves as a type of reservoir for these fungi and bacteria.

-Foodborne infection is another, which we know happens with yersinia, campylobacter and salmonella.

From a surface just seems a lot less likely to me. Usually when people get an infection from a surface it is through a cut and it generally infects only the skin, like staph infections.

There is a certain bacterial load needed before bacteria can do any real harm in the small intestine, I don't see bacteria on a bathroom wall or aerosol particles carrying these bacteria to be of much concern.
 
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I wonder if there are different reasons people get Crohn’s e.g something upsets the immune system or gut integrity which could be genetic vulnerability, early immune development going well or badly, exposure to toxins, bacterial overgrowth through diet and there is a tipping point where the immune system either becomes over reactive or can’t clear the problem so there is chronic inflammation, triggered either by cumulative stressors or a one off food poisoning type infection. Rather than a one size fits all model. Because otherwise it is hard to understand why some people respond beautifully to diet/ certain drugs etc and others struggle.
I wonder if low level exposure to mould/ fungus or something allergic does contribute by placing undue stress on immune system, liver etc. So maybe direct cause and effect or maybe as a last straw that tipped your body over the edge?
So I suppose my advice is bleach the crap out of everything as a precaution. Hope you feel better soon.
 
From a surface just seems a lot less likely to me. Usually when people get an infection from a surface it is through a cut and it generally infects only the skin, like staph infections.

There is a certain bacterial load needed before bacteria can do any real harm in the small intestine, I don't see bacteria on a bathroom wall or aerosol particles carrying these bacteria to be of much concern.

This bacteria sticks to everything, toothbrushes, cups, mouthguards. Things I would put in my mouth or ingest. If you have it in your bathroom, you can see because it all turns pink. Bleach only turns the bacteria yellow it doesn't remove it and it is an extremely stubborn biofilm to remove.
 
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