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Fitness & Exercise Support Group

I am actually taking a course to become a certified fitness trainer right now... and almost done...yay!!! I understand how hard it can be to stick with a program when things start to flare up! I am currently undiagnosed, but have all of the symptoms of Crohn's/colitis. A few ulcers have been found located in a few different places throughout my colon and by the looks of them the doc was sure it was Crohn's, but biopsies came back negative for everything. I tend to alternate days of weight training with cardio days, rather than doing everything all in one work out so I don't deplete all of my energy by overdoing it. If you are not experiencing arthritis as a result of your type of IBD ,which is common as is osteoporosis, I highly recommend weight-bearing exercise for cardio, like brisk walking or jogging as this is proven to help strengthen bones... it also helps strengthen the ligaments (which connect bone to bone) making the joints stronger, which eliminates some of the wear and tear on the actual joints and cartilage, and can offset the development of arthritis and osteoporosis... and at the very least keep it at bay for a while, or keep it less severe when and if it does develop. Also, I cannot emphasize the psychological benefits of exercise, especially for those in our shoes!!! Having IBD of any kind can leave one feeling so frustrated and feeling a lack of control over the situation... but exercise is something that will make you have a sense of control and well being, and the natural endorphins that are released during a good run or bike ride definitely help! The important thing to remember about exercise is that any amount is better than none at all, so even if you are feeling particularly bad and sometimes can't do much, don't let it get you down:)
 
Fitness Enthusiasts:
Looking for some advice and feedback.

I went to my gym yesterday and set up an appointment with the trainer for the so called intro and personal training session. What it ended up being was less of training and more of a sales pitch to signup up for paid personal fitness sessions ($40 per each 0.5 hr session). I was a little turned off by the aggressive sales pitch although I see value in working with a personal trainer for a beginner like me. He kept on saying how there are 100's of fitness regimens and how I could hurt myself if I did not have a personal trainer.

I was wondering if someone could give some insight on the value of hiring a personal trainer. I ideally wanted to begin slow and work my way up to improve my overall fitness and health. I admit I am a novice when it comes to professional exercise and equipment.
Hi there:) I am aware of trainers like these... and they totally suck!!! I am actually working on becoming a trainer myself, and I hate to see this type of attitude among some trainers. I am almost finished with my course and because I suffer badly from some type of undiagnosed IBD and know first hand what it is like, I am always willing to help out and I don't expect anything in return... working out is a trail and error kind of thing for anyone. If you have any questions, you can always ask me... if I can give you a good answer I will, and if not I will just say so:)
Good luck!
Zoey
 
I am actually taking a course to become a certified fitness trainer right now... and almost done...yay!!! I understand how hard it can be to stick with a program when things start to flare up! I am currently undiagnosed, but have all of the symptoms of Crohn's/colitis. A few ulcers have been found located in a few different places throughout my colon and by the looks of them the doc was sure it was Crohn's, but biopsies came back negative for everything. I tend to alternate days of weight training with cardio days, rather than doing everything all in one work out so I don't deplete all of my energy by overdoing it. If you are not experiencing arthritis as a result of your type of IBD ,which is common as is osteoporosis, I highly recommend weight-bearing exercise for cardio, like brisk walking or jogging as this is proven to help strengthen bones... it also helps strengthen the ligaments (which connect bone to bone) making the joints stronger, which eliminates some of the wear and tear on the actual joints and cartilage, and can offset the development of arthritis and osteoporosis... and at the very least keep it at bay for a while, or keep it less severe when and if it does develop. Also, I cannot emphasize the psychological benefits of exercise, especially for those in our shoes!!! Having IBD of any kind can leave one feeling so frustrated and feeling a lack of control over the situation... but exercise is something that will make you have a sense of control and well being, and the natural endorphins that are released during a good run or bike ride definitely help! The important thing to remember about exercise is that any amount is better than none at all, so even if you are feeling particularly bad and sometimes can't do much, don't let it get you down:)
Please show me a study proving walking or jogging strengthens bones.
 
Kel is correct, cardio does not do anything for bone strengthening, only weight-bearing exercise does that. Stair climbing at the bare minimum.
 
weight bearing exercises are those that bear your own weight... that they can also be cardio is besides the point. walking and jogging are exercises where you are on your feet carrying your body weight. they just happen to be cardio in nature... so is swimming a cardio exercise, but it is not weight bearing therefore would not be effective in strengthening bones/joints! You can go on any site like mayo clinic or web md and view information on weight bearing exercise and its benefits including how it decreases risk for osteoporosis and/or can help with artheritis, or google key words like weight bearing exercise and bone density, bone strength, osteoporosis, etc... and you will get lots of results and studies that turn up.
 
Kel is correct, cardio does not do anything for bone strengthening, only weight-bearing exercise does that. Stair climbing at the bare minimum.
It has nothing to do with the exercise being cardio... the stair climbing you mention is cardio. Walking and jogging are weight bearing exercise... you are on your feet and carry your own weight along... that is why they can help with bone density/strength. Goggle key words and there are lots of studies that prove this. It just happens that most weight baring exercises happen to be cardio in nature, so I am sorry if you misinterpreted that
 
The reason I specifically stated "I recommend weight bearing exercises such as walking and jogging for cardio" is that because they are weight bearing... therefore you kill 2 birds with one stone... You have both benefits of improving cardiovascular fitness and bone/joint strength and bone density. For example, walking and jogging are weight bearing because you are on your feet supporting your own weight, but swimming, which is cardio as well, is not weight bearing because your weight is suspended in water... therefore it would have no impact on the bones or joints whatsoever.
 
Here is one:
http://jap.physiology.org/content/90/2/565.long

also here are some helpful articleshttp://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/tipsandtricks
Half way down the bottom of this pg there are exercises recommended for increasing bone density. They are:
1. weight training
2. plyometrics
3. jump training
4. stair running
5. bodyweight exercises
6. jump roping
7. running
8. hiking
9. backpacking
it then goes on to explain that cycling and swimming may decrease bone density, and
why.

If you go to http://www.webmd.com/osteoporosis/living-with-osteoporosis-7/exercise-weight-bearing there is also helpful information, and it listed 8 recommended activities...
#3 was brisk walking... and I quote the site here... "one fitness trend that never goes away, walking is still hugely popular among women-and a great way to revamp your bone health. A study of nurses found that walking 4hrs a week gave them a 41% lower risk of hip fractures, compared to walking less that an hour per week. Brisk walking is best, but you can adapt your speed to your current fitness level. Walking is free. You can do it anywhere, anytime, even when traveling."
#6 Hiking... I am quoting the site again here... "The work of weight bearing-and the impact as your feet hit the ground-can increase bone density, especially in your hips. It's just like walking, and then some. You'll get even more impact on those bones if your going uphill or downhill, and that can improve bone health even more. More impact on your feet and legs translates into more bone density, says the surgeon general.

Here are a few more links:
http://blog.melioguide.com/osteoporosis-exercises/bone-mass-and-exercise/
http://niams.nih.gov/health_info/bone/bone_heath/exercise/
 
here are two more sites that offer helpful info on this subject...

www.iofbonehealth.org/exercise
www.iofbonehealth.org/exercise-recommendations

I am pretty busy today, but I am sure I can find more as well... there is tons of info about this out there. Hardly any studies were done on men, however.
Of course if one already has severe arthritis or osteoporosis they may be limited in what is actually safe, and/or may have to start out very slow, with very little or no impact (like the stair climber) and gradually work up to more intensity/impact.
 
It's still much better to build bone density by using stronger weight-bearing activity like actual weight lifting and stair climbing. I'm not disputing your studies, just saying that the more weight, and the more resistance, the better the results.
 
That study is of female athletes. One of the links you posted specifically states walking made no difference in bone mineral density.
 
It states that if you just stroll along easily it doesn't do much good, and the study compared 2 groups of female athletes (which varied in the intensity of their exercise) to a sedentary population, but I am not on here to argue with you. In fact this stuff is public knowledge at this point... there are public service announcements all over TV about it... even on channels like nick jr. etc., targeting younger people and parents because being active at a young age can prevent problems later... I just saw one last night where a young boy called his elderly grandmother on the phone asking to go for a walk, which then went on to explain that regular physical activity of this kind can prevent bone loss later in life. like I said a hundred times... information is everywhere out there... I don't know why you are so combative and hostile, but to each his/her own. What makes you such an expert anyway? I would think as a forum monitor you would be a little more knowledgeable... and a word of advice... read more closely and pay more attention to detail before you argue. I'm going out for a 3 mile run right now!
 
It's still much better to build bone density by using stronger weight-bearing activity like actual weight lifting and stair climbing. I'm not disputing your studies, just saying that the more weight, and the more resistance, the better the results.
weight lifting is fine, but it doesn't affect the hips and legs so much... except squats for example... and if you are doing weight training where you are sitting that gets the spine, shoulders arms, etc... the results are very specific to the exercise you are doing and the area it targets... so a variety of exercise is important. Stair climbing is fine, but because it doesn't have the impact, it is not as effective as a preventative measure... however if you already have issues with arthritis, or bone loss, it is a great alternative because it is less wear and tear on already damaged cartilage. The main area that most women experience bone loss is in the pelvic bone, and hip fractures are not uncommon in older women after accidentally slipping or falling, so this area is important to pay attention to, which is why I stated exercise like walking (fast walking... not strolling along) and jogging are good... just because the stair climbing wasn't mentioned doesn't mean I don't think its good... in fact I do it all winter during bad weather.
 
When I refer to weight lifting, I mean a variety of the activity, not just sittin and using the arms to lift weights. True weight training involves a variety of movements including squats, lunges, and using resistance machinery to move the legs and torso in ways that manipulate the large and small muscles of the lower back, buttocks and thighs in ways that will help strengthen the entire pelvic cradle and the hips, the bones that are most likely to break later in life. If this type of weight training is started at a younger age and a higher intensity, it can greatly reduce the risk of bone density loss later in life. If it is started at an older age and lower intensity, in can still precent further bone loss and even rebuild some bone density and prevent breakage.
 
I'm new to this forum and would just like to say that I've appreciated the comments made by Zoey as exercise is really important to me too and I believe it helps me fight my Crohns not just on a physical level but on a mental level too. Every long-distance run I finish feels like a victory for me and a kick in the teeth to Crohns. I've been a little disturbed by your comments Kel as you seem to be very argumentative and as a newbie, I find it off-putting that I could be entering a forum where I might be attacked for sharing something that someone else disagrees with.
 

Cat-a-Tonic

Super Moderator
Hi everyone, let's all take a step back and calm down. No need for the discussion to become heated (although I am glad that everyone is so passionate about fitness!).

Zoey, I know you're relatively new to the forum and I do hope you stick around because I am sure you do have a lot of valuable information to contribute. I think how this got started was that Kel was just asking for links. When you state information as fact, just generally speaking and not specifically for this thread only, it's best to post a link backing up your information. That's all, I don't believe he was attempting to be rude or hostile.

Kel, you do have a bit of a blunt writing style at times which may come across as being harsh or unsupportive (I know you're not unsupportive, but perhaps think about the way you word things in the future particularly around newer members). I know you're also very knowledgeable about fitness and you've given me some good advice in the past and I know you're supportive, that just doesn't always come across in your very short posts like the ones directed at Zoey.

Can we all agree to get along? We're all here for fitness and we're all fighting our own battles - let's not fight with each other too. :) Sound good?
 
I've been on the forums for a while but haven't joined in discussions much but I'd like to change that. Since being diagnosed and surgery for Crohn's I've taken up running, did a few 5ks with my wife, and got back to my favorite sport, soccer, after a break during college. It helps keep my mind off things when I get stressed from life.
 

dave13

Forum Monitor
I got the o.k. from my surgeon and GI to start an exercise program.I checked out some gyms in my area and joined one.I went through the orientation last night.I've been thinking about this as my surgeries healed and finally did it.

I want to be proactive fighting crohn's.I'm not a join the gym kinda person to be honest.I'm hoping being around like minded people will motivate me.I asked what the busy/not busy times were and the less busy times suit my schedule.

My resection was an open surgery.I would be happy to here from anyone about strengthening my abdominals.

I've been walking and doing gentle yoga.Going to the gym is a big step for me.I figure I'll try 2-3 times a week to start.They also have a pool and sauna.There are a variety of cardio and yoga classes that are included as well.The facilities seem clean and kept up.I'll take it slow and see how it goes.

This should be interesting.
 
Sounds great Dave! As you say, take it slowly. You don't want to burn yourself out too soon and then dislike it and give up! Just set yourself a couple of times a week to begin with. You will be surprised to see how quickly you improve at first, and then that will give you the motivation to keep going! Are you thinking of focussing mostly on cardio or weights?
 

dave13

Forum Monitor
Sounds great Dave! As you say, take it slowly. You don't want to burn yourself out too soon and then dislike it and give up! Just set yourself a couple of times a week to begin with. You will be surprised to see how quickly you improve at first, and then that will give you the motivation to keep going! Are you thinking of focussing mostly on cardio or weights?
I'm thinking weights to start off. An overall program using free weights and nautilus equipment.Start slow and go from there.I'll check out the cardio and yoga classes.There included with the membership.I'll hold off on them for now.Maybe once I get in a routine and things are going well I'll look into them.
 
Hi everyone. This blog is very inspirational. I had my surgery at the end of January and my stomach muscles were cut into, as well as resectioning was done. I haven't worked out in quite sometime and I am so scared because I dont' know my limits. I still get sore at the end of each day so the thought of even lifting the slightest weight scare me. I think before I even think of hitting the gym I might ease into working out by doing slow walking on my treadmill. My question to everyone is does making your body stronger by working out help with CD flare ups? Help!!
 

Cat-a-Tonic

Super Moderator
Chicky, good question. I don't know if there have been any studies done about working out and the severity of flare-ups. I can tell you anecdotally from personal experience, I was mildly flaring for the past year or so, and I continued exercising as often as I was able to. I am not sure, but I like to think that keeping up with exercise helped keep my flare mild. I was of course doing other things in an effort to keep the flare under control - medication, supplements, getting enough sleep, staying hydrated, etc. I believe it was a combination of all those things that kept the flare from getting any worse.

There have been studies showing that exercise can help with chronic pain, particularly joint pain (I started exercising regularly in the first place because my physical therapist said it would help me immensely with my arthritis, and she was right). Exercise also helps improve things like moods, depression, and stress levels, which all are important to manage with IBD. So in those ways exercise has definitely helped me. So again, I'm not sure if exercise has a direct effect on helping IBD, but it is beneficial in multiple related ways and personally it's done me tons of good. :) I hope that helps?
 
Just wanted to chime in on exercise. I've had crohn's for over 40 years. I've controlled it in large part because of regular exercise. Having crohn's is stressful , no one will argue that fact. Stress leads to flares. However, exercise controls stress. I'd say work out to where it makes you breathe hard. Then you know it's doing some good. Once those endorphines are released you get this great feeling of well-being that comes over you. Stress just vanishes! Obviously, you don't want to overdue it. But many people I know usually don't come close to this point. Stick with it and good luck!
Jim
 

dave13

Forum Monitor
I finally went to the gym.I've been twice this week and will try for every other day.I'm taking it slow.I'm already looking forward to next time.Never thought I'd say that!

I wanted to start last week but delayed it.Last Monday I started having pain under my resection scar.I ran my fingers along the scar and could feel a small bump under the scar.It really hurt.I called my surgeons office and talked with a nurse and described it to her.She said my sutures should be dissolved by now,but sometimes one does not and can cause pain. Without actually examining me she couldn't say for sure.I was paranoid I did something and it was a incisinal hernia.She said since the bump was hard and didn't push back in when I felt it,she felt it was a suture.I can still feel a small bump but the pain is gone.I guess she was right.

Anyone else have a similar issue with sutures?My resection was my first operation so I have nothing to compare it to.
 
hello everybody. im hoping to get some good advice. as some of you may know from previous posts, i am in the military, and i just went through the process of being diagnosed. during that time, i was very constipated and my stomach pains were so intense that i couldn't do any physical training. it has been almost 3 months since i have done any intense physical training. i have FINALLY been cleared to start physical training again, but needless to say i have gained weight from not being able too. what i am looking for is a meal replacement protein shake to start taking after my lunch time workouts. i have heard that soft foods/liquid diets are good for people with crohn's, so that is another bonus. i want to find one that tastes ok (doesn't have to tastes great, just tolerable), high in protein, low-moderate in calories and carbs, and high in vitamins and minerals. any recommendations will be great. i also need to find something to eat for breakfast that i can take to morning PT with me and eat afterwards, as i do not go back home after morning PT. I was thinking hard boiled eggs and fruit, but i'm just wondering if anybody has any other suggestions on that topic as well.
 
A friend who knows a lot about nutrition told me recently to try a protein powder with chia seeds. She was suggesting chia seeds for digestion, but I can't eat seeds, so she was saying that would be a good format to get those. I haven't tried it myself yet, but just passing it along.

Glad you're feeling better, and good luck with your training!
 
Hi devin , I don't know much about those protein shakes ect, but I imagine you would want to be careful which ones you have. If they are packed full of sugar , artificial sweeteners and other chemicals they could do much more harm than good. Have you looked into juicing or smoothies at all?

I would have thought eggs would be ok unless you are still a bit bunged up and I find a nice ripe banana is good for food on the go (the greener ones can give me tummy ache).
As for vitamins do you take any vit pills ?
 

hawkeye

Moderator
Staff member
I had a colonoscopy last Thursday and it was after this that my Dr suggested Remicade because he had been unable to get the camera all the way to my lower intestine due to what he thought was severe inflammation. I had a barium test today and though I'll see my GI Dr on Monday to talk about the next steps, the Dr today said it was a severe stricture causing the narrowing rather than inflammation. So I guess now I'm not sure what my GI is going to recommend.

I currently take pentasa and I feel healthy but as I said before, my last two flare-ups have both happened when I've taken a break from running .... maybe that's because running is a natural stress-reliever?
How did the GI appointment go? Not being able to get the camera through sounds like my stricture that I had taken out a few weeks ago.
 
I finally went to the gym.I've been twice this week and will try for every other day.I'm taking it slow.I'm already looking forward to next time.Never thought I'd say that!

I wanted to start last week but delayed it.Last Monday I started having pain under my resection scar.I ran my fingers along the scar and could feel a small bump under the scar.It really hurt.I called my surgeons office and talked with a nurse and described it to her.She said my sutures should be dissolved by now,but sometimes one does not and can cause pain. Without actually examining me she couldn't say for sure.I was paranoid I did something and it was a incisinal hernia.She said since the bump was hard and didn't push back in when I felt it,she felt it was a suture.I can still feel a small bump but the pain is gone.I guess she was right.

Anyone else have a similar issue with sutures?My resection was my first operation so I have nothing to compare it to.
Yeah I still have mine.
 
Hi everyone,

Just wondering if I can have some advice on exercise. I am still awaiting a diagnosis for suspected Crohn's - been in an out of hospital in January, cameras everywhere lol and although I'm feeling physically stronger than I have in a long time, I am still absolutely exhausted. I'd had Ferinject for anaemia, I can walk short distances but then I seem to hit a wall and feel completely drained of any energy for the rest of the day - feel sick, spasming in the right hand side under my rib cage, burning in my stomach (ulcer there) and generally feel awful.

I want to up my exercise, for my mental health as much as my physical wellbeing. I also don't wanna put loads of weight on - one '''good''' thing to come from all this has been I've got some weight off.

Thanks in advance for any help!

Love to all,

Eve

x
 

Cat-a-Tonic

Super Moderator
Hi Eve, welcome to the forum. I'd say listen to your body - if it is asking for rest, give it rest. With starting exercise, I'd take it very slowly and gently at first and continue listening to your body - if something hurts or your body doesn't respond well, then stop or try something else. I'd suggest maybe starting with some gentle yoga. There's a good thread here with a link to some very gentle yoga poses (see the 4th post in this thread):
http://www.crohnsforum.com/showthread.php?t=28108

If that goes well then you could gradually increase the time/intensity of exercise that you're doing. I wouldn't push it too much too fast though or you may just end up feeling a lot worse. Good luck!
 
How did the GI appointment go? Not being able to get the camera through sounds like my stricture that I had taken out a few weeks ago.
It's seems like a lot has happened since I posted that message about my GI appointment. I ended up taking Imuran but had the most severe allergic reaction so was taken off of it and since then, I've spoken to my GI but mostly to let him know that I think he didn't take proper care of me. During our conversation, he told me that my options were Humira, Surgery or Remicade and I simply haven't been back to him.

I've started taking Pentasa again and trying to be careful about what I eat. I'm still running and generally feeling good so unless that changes, I'm not in a rush to try something new again because I had such a horrible time on the Imuran :(

It sounds like you had surgery, how did that go?

Sarah xx
 
Hi Eve, welcome to the forum. I'd say listen to your body - if it is asking for rest, give it rest. With starting exercise, I'd take it very slowly and gently at first and continue listening to your body - if something hurts or your body doesn't respond well, then stop or try something else. I'd suggest maybe starting with some gentle yoga. There's a good thread here with a link to some very gentle yoga poses (see the 4th post in this thread):
http://www.crohnsforum.com/showthread.php?t=28108

If that goes well then you could gradually increase the time/intensity of exercise that you're doing. I wouldn't push it too much too fast though or you may just end up feeling a lot worse. Good luck!
Hey Cat, thanks a lot for the advice/validation. It's just so frustrating. But at least I'm well enough to go for very short walks - I guess I'm surprised just how little I can manage and how exhausted I am after it. Monday I walked a grand total of half a mile round trip and I was flat out for the rest of the day! I'll definitely look into yoga, could be quite amusing considering how unbendy I am! x
 

Cat-a-Tonic

Super Moderator
Eve, I'm ridiculously un-flexible (inflexible?) too. I can't touch my toes, most of the time I can barely touch my shins, ha ha. So I can't do some of the more advanced yoga poses, and I prefer to do yoga in my home by myself (using a DVD or the Wii fit) rather than go embarass myself in an actual class in front of people. :p But, I can do some yoga poses and they do seem to help, particularly with my arthritis. So don't worry too much about not being very bendy, it hasn't been a major detriment in my experience and I've still gotten lots of benefits from yoga. :)
 

dave13

Forum Monitor
Hi Eve,I agree with Cat-a-Tonic.I feel yoga has great benefits.I have arthritis as well and a work injury in my L1-L3 area.I think you would be pleasantly surprised if you give it a try.

I figured I would give an update.I've been going to the gym 3 times a week now for a little over a month.I've been using the nautilus equipment and have enjoyed it.I take it slow and I push myself with in reason.I have been walking on the treadmill as well.I can walk outside now the weather is improving.

I am interested in using free weights and get away from the nautilus equipment.I talked with a trainer at the gym.I told her my medical history and told her I was interested in an overall program with emphasis on my core.We are going to meet next tuesday and I will see what she came up with.

I do feel better going to the gym.It makes me feel like I'm doing something to give CD a kick in the ass.Helps me emotionally.

I'm looking forward to seeing,and trying,the program she developed.I figure I will be more motivated to go the gym if I set goals for myself.I'll let you all know how it goes.
 

Cat-a-Tonic

Super Moderator
I do feel better going to the gym.It makes me feel like I'm doing something to give CD a kick in the ass.Helps me emotionally.
Yes, that's how I feel too! :) I obviously take my meds and try to get enough sleep & avoid trigger foods and that kind of stuff, but that all feels somewhat passive. Working out is the one thing I can do where I really feel like I'm actually physically fighting my illness. It's a great feeling. And yes, it helps me emotionally as well - it relieves so much stress and chases the depression away. I almost always feel better both physically and mentally after a workout.
 
Hey hey!

Well my ski season ended and as a professional coach I had to step down from some of my responsibilities but now understand a bit better how to manage my energy levels and still deal with athletes. The big issue is always hydration when I'm active and altitude/glaciers where there are no bathrooms.

For those guys who recently started post about the gym, I too recently joined one and am going to try and get on my road bike soon...I'm still learning my limits though. I ran for an hour yesterday and have been just now recovering. I use free weights though and a Swiss ball which really help stabilize and use the minor muscle groups throughout the body and the core.

Next week I'm going to start yoga. Is it strange to think that jumping off a small cliff on skis is less terrifying than a mat and room full of stretchy people? Lol.

I just wanted to say though, as much as CD really sucks, it's nice to live life a little and get back into the world and I love this forum and the support it provides...it's been a great inspiration on those tough days!
 

Cat-a-Tonic

Super Moderator
So as everyone can see, we now have our own fitness & exercise sub-forum! Let's get the fitness talk going again! :D Feel free to start your own threads or post in here.
 

theOcean

Moderator
Strongly considering making my own thread now that I'm back to it this week! :D And to keep me motivated to exercise more.
 

Jmrogers4

Moderator
Can I join the club? Jack really wants to start working out and I want to be a good example. His goal is to build muscle and stamina in order to make the high school baseball team next year. After not being able to do sports for most of this year he is really struggling. And since he is finally growing and putting on weight he wants it to be muscle weight.
I want to be a good example and get him in the habit of being healthy and exercising (plus get healthy myself) I could definitely loose quite a few pounds but mainly just want to be healthy.
Wish us luck.
 
Hi. I am just now catching up with this thread and did not read the whole thing but want to join too. I am an avid exerciser...running, strength training, yoga and anything physical. I do all of these things mainly to keep myself feeling in control of my body and my situation. Right now I am at a pretty big low. I am in the midst of a really bad flare. I try to exercise daily, but I feel like this thing is winning. My energy levels are low. I have lost large amounts of weight and friends and family question weather I should be doing anything physical at all. I am trying to taper off of prednisone and it is not going well.

It's a hard pill to swallow sometimes. This time last year I was feeling on top of the world after completing my first full marathon. Now I am unable to run due to a stress fracture in my foot, likely due to extended use of prednisone. I have been cycling and strength training, but, like I said, those things are even becoming a challenge. Oh, how far I have fallen. Yesterday, for the first time in forever, I left work at 10 AM due to how bad I was feeling and spent the rest of the day in bed. This made me feel even worse about things. Almost like giving up.

But today I made a vow to myself not to let Crohn's get the best of me. I know from past experience that I do better when I keep pushing. Physical activity does so much for both my physical and mental well being. Looking forward to giving and getting support from fellow crohnies!
 

Cat-a-Tonic

Super Moderator
TheOcean, go for it! :) Whatever helps keep you motivated is a good thing!

Jacqui, that's great that you're looking to make exercise a family venture. And wanting to be healthy, that's the kind of goal that will make you stick to it. I read a study awhile back that said that people who work out to lose weight, look good, etc - basically any superficial goal like that - people with that kind of goal are far less likely to stick to it than people who set goals about improving their health and taking care of their body. So I'm sure you'll do great! Do you have anything in mind as for how to start - are you thinking more cardio, or more strength-training? Do you belong to a gym or do you plan to exercise at home/outdoors?

Cookie, don't push yourself too hard - in a flare particularly, you really need to listen to your body and give it rest when it needs it. I know, it's frustrating to have to hold yourself back like that - I feel the same way when I have to take a rest day due to my body not cooperating with me. Work out when you are able to, but recognize that your body needs rest to heal, too. Try not to get too discouraged. Once you get the flare more under control, hopefully you can then work back up to your previous level of fitness.
 

Jmrogers4

Moderator
I was thinking more cardio for me although I do need to do some strength training but Jack really wants to do strength training, I think he needs to do both but try convincing a teenage boy of that. I've done a 4 mile hike in the foothills the last 3 weekends and I've convinced Jack to go with me on Sunday (since it's mother's day) I think I should be able to convince him he needs to do cardio as well after that. The first part of the hike is straight up hill for about a 1/2 mile and then just a gradual rise for the next mile and then another 1/2 mile up on steep switch backs. I had to stop about 6 times the first time I did it and only had to stop twice last weekend.
We did join a gym but with baseball practice/games for him the last couple of months we really haven't gone. Unfortunately baseball is just not steady exercise. But he has to be there an hour before the game so I usually try and walk before the game starts. There are tons of outdoor stuff to do around here maybe if I can get him doing cardio outside and weight lifting at the gym it would make it more fun?
 

Cat-a-Tonic

Super Moderator
Jacqui, that sounds like a good plan to me - during the warmer months I like doing cardio outside and weights in the gym too. (During the winter I walk my dog outside but that's it, I do cardio on a machine indoors as it just gets too cold here to do much outside.) If you have bicycles, going for a ride can be really fun. Depending on how well his Crohn's is doing or how he's feeling on any given day, you may want to do bike rides through more urban areas so that bathrooms would be more easily accessable, and I'd also suggest that you bring extra water/sports drinks with in case he gets a bit dehydrated. Hiking sounds like a good plan too, although again think about stuff like keeping hydrated and knowing where the bathrooms are (or if it's a situation where he'd have to go in the woods, bring TP or wet wipes with).

I guess the key to exercise, for me anyway, is to have fun. I'm fortunate in that I love lifting weights! It makes me feel really strong and healthy and awesome, I can be the opposite of sick girl for an hour or two in the gym when I'm lifting. :) But anyway, if your son doesn't find hiking particularly fun, try to find something active that is more fun. Tennis, frisbee, kayaking or canoeing, even something like hula hooping can burn a lot of calories and be a good source of cardio! And if you live near a lake or river, sometimes you can rent a kayak or canoe, so you don't necessarily need to spend a bunch of money and buy one (full disclosure, I own a kayak and I love it). I'm rambling again but try to see what cardio-type activities seem to get your son motivated.

I suppose I should also say, for both you and your son - start slowly and don't overdo it at first. Not just for IBD'ers but for everyone, it's not a good idea to suddenly throw yourself into a hardcore exercise regime. Start slowly, maybe short weightlifting sessions with light weights, bike rides around the neighborhood, half-hour canoe rentals, etc until you build yourself up. Tell your son, he should listen to his body, and if something hurts then he should stop doing it. I'm not sure if he has any EIMs, but for me I have arthritis and GERD, so I have to limit my abdominal exercises or my GERD will get angry, and I can't jog or my hip arthritis will give me terrible pains. But I can ride my bike, do the elliptical at the gym, I can walk my dog just fine including on hilly hiking paths (sometimes walking hurts but jogging is far worse), I can kayak and I can lift heavy weights so long as I mostly avoid the abdominals machines. :) So he should listen to his body, but once he knows what he can handle, it'll be okay to push himself a little bit too.

Yikes, sorry that was so long! I hope that helps a bit.
 
TheOcean, go for it! :)
Cookie, don't push yourself too hard - in a flare particularly, you really need to listen to your body and give it rest when it needs it. I know, it's frustrating to have to hold yourself back like that - I feel the same way when I have to take a rest day due to my body not cooperating with me. Work out when you are able to, but recognize that your body needs rest to heal, too. Try not to get too discouraged. Once you get the flare more under control, hopefully you can then work back up to your previous level of fitness.
I know. No worries. Just having one of those "screw Crohn's" kind of days. I know my limitations well. Yesterday was a major downer because my limitation was "zero", as in, I was able to do absolutely nothing. I needed to refresh my attitude...maybe I sounded a bit over zealous. I do appreciate your caring!
 

dave13

Forum Monitor
My update goes along with these recent posts.

I just started working with free weights.I worked with a trainer for two separate one hour sessions.I had been using the nautilus equipment and going to free weights is almost like starting over again.I like the difference.

I like the program the trainer developed for me.She did a good job with my limitations considered.I had to omit one exercise because I need to wait a few more weeks,according to my surgeons nurse.It did cause me discomfort.

I guess it is up to me to do it on my own now.I am happy I am enjoying going to the gym.I was never a gym person...CD gives me extra motivation I guess.I feel the psychological benefits are equal to the actual physical benefits.

I'm taking it slow and doing what I can.I'm fortunate to go at a time when the gym isn't too busy,that helps motivate me.

I would recommend getting physical to any crohnie.I would urge being mindful of your limitations and start slow.It is something we can do to fight CD,but it should also be enjoyable.
 
Thought I'd share what I've been doing on the exercise front since being diagnosed in December last year.

Before getting the 'gastro bug' that turned out to be Crohn's I was right into martial arts, pole dancing and walking. I had 10 days in hospital and as I didn't respond that well with prednisone, my GI put me onto infliximab. I stopped exercising until mid-January (just after my 2nd infusion) when I felt I have recovered enough to try martial arts again - I was really nervous starting but got back into the swing of things pretty quickly.

In mid-February I joined a gym with people I work with and have been able to make it there 3 times a week on average. Exercising at lunchtime is the best option for me - I find I'm way too tired when I get home from work. I haven't been a gym member for years, but am really enjoying getting into the classes they offer. I started off slowly and have now started to increase what I'm doing. I've been able to pick up a lot of the core workout classes and also the Les Mills brand of classes (CX Works and Pump seem to suit me really well). I've found that the more cardio-based classes are a lot more of a challenge for me and I'm not that keen on doing burpees!

About 10 weeks ago I got back into the pole dancing and am almost back at the level that I was when I had to stop last year.

I find exercise is a great way for me to reduce my stress and am now getting much better at listening to my body - if I'm feeling tired I'll either have a day off or just do a light walk on the treadmill. I've also found that I don't have the energy for exercise in the few days after my infusion - I tend to catch up with friends for lunch on those days.

I had a bio-scan done on Friday which I'll get done every 2-3 months. I was really surprised and happy with the results - my BMI was in the normal range, my body fat percentage was quite low and my 'fitness score' was quite high.

My goals for the year are to keep my BMI and body fat where they are and see if I can increase my fitness score, to progress to the advanced level in pole dancing, to continue my martial arts training through winter (which is already proving to be a challenge with some of the frosty mornings) and to increase my cardio workouts.
 
I was thinking more cardio for me although I do need to do some strength training but Jack really wants to do strength training, I think he needs to do both but try convincing a teenage boy of that. I've done a 4 mile hike in the foothills the last 3 weekends and I've convinced Jack to go with me on Sunday (since it's mother's day) I think I should be able to convince him he needs to do cardio as well after that. The first part of the hike is straight up hill for about a 1/2 mile and then just a gradual rise for the next mile and then another 1/2 mile up on steep switch backs. I had to stop about 6 times the first time I did it and only had to stop twice last weekend.
We did join a gym but with baseball practice/games for him the last couple of months we really haven't gone. Unfortunately baseball is just not steady exercise. But he has to be there an hour before the game so I usually try and walk before the game starts. There are tons of outdoor stuff to do around here maybe if I can get him doing cardio outside and weight lifting at the gym it would make it more fun?
Unless he is morbidly obese I would strongly suggest you let him focus on the strength training.
 
I started swimming again a couple of weeks ago when I was on 30 mg of prednisone. I thought it would help with the insomnia. Haha. It was going well. I'd swim and take a recovery nap and be fine. Now I've dropped my way down to 20 mg and I'm back to not having any energy to swim. I started slow with only 30 mins of light swimming and/or just playing around in the water, but today I did 20 mins and I've been wiped for the whole day. I'm so tired of not doing anything active. I feel like there's something else behind this exercise fatigue. Does anyone have ideas for things that might need checking? My iron is low, but the doctor won't give me anymore infusions because my body just ignores it (anemia of chronic illness). I do take a multivitamin, vitamin d and sublingual B12 (which is a lifesaver), and I try to have milk or a good protein substance after my swims. I have the motivation right now of visiting the Grand Canyon in...oh wow..next month...that I want to get a bit into shape for, so I don't want to give up.
 
I find exercising 5 days a week manageable. 20 minutes of cardio every day essential to regulate all organs. I did a bit of research to Australia national physical activity guidelines and 150 minutes a week helps me regulate everything. I do 6 hours roughly of weekly weights training which helps keep my muscles strong and fluid. Check a bit more about me here https://www.myanytimechallenge.com/p/entry/5371b69ee308b29a7b00000f#.U3MCmBYazCQ willing to give training advice to any of y'all who need it :)
 
Yes, sleep has been weird, but I seem to be getting enough of it on my non-workout days. I am dropping the prednisone 5mg every 5 days, which doesn't seem too fast. I'm just going to try to do what I can when I exercise and of course check in with my doctor about this on Friday.
 
Tomorrow is my first day lowering the dose and slowly tapering off. I have been keeping a journal inorder to find out what foods are affecting me. So far, definitely onions. So I a slowly feeling better with the prednisone, extra sleep, and very careful with my diet.
 
I am lowering prednisone by 5 mg every 7 days. I have been doing swimming and find it really helps. Hopefully in another week I ca get back to the gym. My knees are acting up as they usually do during a flare.
 
Hi, sorry if this has already been discussed. I had anal 3 setons placed in January since then they have been healing (and if this sounds right) getting tucked into there new home! Does anyone have these (lovely ha!) And find a way to exercise without pulling or snagging them or them rubbing, digging in or the wound to sweep more. I tried swimming I was kinda told not to but from what I read on this forum people said they had, so I gave it a go it was very sore!! I walk a lot and if it's a warm day it especially get sore. I don't wanna waste money signing up to a contract to a gym if I can't ho or make my self poorly..

any advice wud b great.
I carry a lot of weight round my tum thighs n bum, so as u can understand it's difficult to try work those areas out!

Thanks in advance.xxx
 
@Carrie171087: Sorry to hear about the issues you are going through. There are lots of people, unfortunately, with similar concerns and grievances.

Try calmoseptine (or something similar) ointment before you walk or exercise to reduce some of the discomfort and potential damage due to skin chafing.

Exercise in whichever form works for you (doesn't have to be always cardio) will be beneficial in more ways than one. So don't give up on it just yet. Gym is a good option as you will have access to different types of equipment and you can hopefully learn and find out about ones you can tolerate and sustain.
 
I'm 18 years old just graduated high school and with a lot of hard work and a little luck I got a baseball scholarship to go play college ball. Very excited I leave on the 29th! But I am worried to be living four hours away from home and with a dealing with a lot more stress from both school work and training for baseball. Never had to deal with my crohns all by myself. I was just wondering if there were any college athletes on here that might have a few tips or anything?
 
fastlane25,

Hi and congrats on your success!!!
I'm not a college athlete but I used to be a world cup alpine coach and still coach while I go back to university. Crohn's on the road really means to prep and watch the diet for me. I can't let my athletes down on the road so I'm very vigilant and don't experiment with food. My recoveries are slower when I'm flying a lot (especially over to Europe) so I let my colleagues know and hydrate a ton for flights.
For you I would be very open with your coaches, your health is their priority and should be yours as well. Most will have no idea about the disease and there's a lot of bias and misunderstanding in Crohn's so assure them that you got to that level with the disease, so therefore, you can definitely continue to perform and surpass your level with their support. Even my colleagues had to have me spell that out for them occasionally :).

Best of luck!!!
 
I am currently trying to play college baseball while dealing with my crohns. Only been in school for a month and already had 2 flares! it makes it really hard because I have a coach who doesn't really care and a whole team of guys who just don't understand what I am going through. It has always been my dream to play college baseball, but this isn't how I imagined it. I have worked so hard to just get here I don't know how I can just give it up, but I cant keep going on this same path. it just doesn't seem worth it anymore. I don't know how to bring this up to my parents, but I needed to talk with someone about this. What do you guys think I should do?
 
Hi guys I am 23 years old. I was diagnosed with crohn's in 2012 subsequently I underwent intestinal resection surgery since the condition couldn't be controlled. I was normal until 2014 after which my systems started showing up, mostly I suffer from stricturing and obstruction. I was on remicade treatment which went considerable good. Now again I am having an horrible flare up with stricturing of descending colon, I underwent balloon dilation last week the doctor says this would give me relief for a while , due to this reason I had to defer an year from post graduation (biotechnology). I thought this is high time I must concentrate on my health before things go worse.
Has anyone had intestinal stricturing or obstruction? ? Can anyone suggest me tips by which you can avoid obstruction? ? Lately , I have started cycling my energy level is good, but I am scared with the obstruction cause without reason it all starts and I must get hospitalised, I have already been in and out of hospital 3 times in last 2 weeks which is annoying! !
 
It is damaging inflammation that causes the strictures, which are scar tissue left behind after flair ups, so in order to avoid accumulating too much of this scar tissue you have to keep the inflammation in check as much as possible. If you are still having flair ups and/or inflammation that sometimes occurs with little or no symptoms in spite of trying different meds you may want to check into using some herbal remedies along with your meds as there are some that do reduce inflammation quite well. Of course you want to check with your doctor about the possibilities of drug interaction with your meds, and as a precaution use the herbal supplements several hours before or after taking any prescription meds to reduce the possibility of any adverse interaction between the two and because it may be unknown if one thing may interfere with the absorption of another. I have recently been diagnosed with Crohn's after having problems most of my life (I am 47 yrs. old and for years was told I had IBS or "bad nerves" with no testing or diagnostic procedures whatsoever, even though I have a family history and was experiencing all the classic symptoms), and I have been using herbal remedies for quite some time because I knew I was not being properly diagnosed and really had no choice but to take matters into my own hands and do a lot of research to educate myself. Some of the things that help me are boswellia serrata, aloe ( but be careful here.... it can cause diahrea), omega 3's, and vitamin D. I have also used medical marijuana (ingesting, not smoking) as it has anti-inflammatory properties and is an immunosuppressant. Although my new doctor has told me it is very obvious by the amount of damage that I have that I have had my condition for at least 30 years and there is extensive damage, these things have helped enough to at least enable me to remain productive and work on a regular basis. However, These things alone are not the answer to treating any IBD, but can be helpful in addition to traditional meds... just remember to talk to your doctor and do not discontinue any of the meds he/she prescribes without first discussing it. I wish you well and hope this helps... Also, exercise is really helpful... I notice a very negative change if I go even a day being inactive, so keep up the cycling :)
 
Yeah zoeythecat, as you mentioned in your post my last CT scan showed severe inflammation of my desending colon and colonoscopy confirmed the stricturing in the same location. I have consulted a well known ayruvedic doctor lately who has suggested some medication's, though I was a bit skeptical about ayruveda I thought I'll give it a shot this time!! It's been over one month but there is no any evident change In my health, even my blood test inflammatory markers are elevated. My doctor says ayruveda takes time to show it's effect. I am anyways continuing my cycling regime at least I feel good for cycling. I am a bit concerned though because stricturing is very painful and if it goes worse I may have to undergo a surgery again!! Does alternative medicine really take a long time to show it's effect ??
 
I would imagine that it would depend on the individual and the types of herbs or alternative medicine being used. I went undiagnosed for most of my life... I had digestive issues starting around 5 or 6 yrs old and everyone said I was faking it because I didn't want to go to school and I couldn't possibly be sick because I didn't have a fever, then as I got older the doctors kept saying I must just have IBS and kept giving me meds that didn't work. Some also blamed it on "bad nerves" and said I needed to calm down ( I am the most laid back person ever. ridiculous.) Or they blamed it on female hormones (ignorant) even though I had a family history of both crohn's and colitis... and no diagnostic testing was ever done. They said they felt it wasn't necessary. I finally got a doctor who listened to me (just a couple of months ago) and he was shocked by the colonoscopy and said he has never seen so much damage and does not understand how I have been living like this for so long as there is at least 30 years of damage done! From March of 2009 -November 2011 I had an uncontrollable flair up so bad that I was going to the toilet every 45 minutes, more than 20x/day, passing huge amounts of blood and mucus, ended up in ER and was told it was just my gall bladder and if I had it out then I would be back to normal. I didn't buy that and didn't have my gall bladder out. I researched natural cures/remedies for gall bladder disease, and made dietary changes, which resulted in very slow, but worthy changes and after about 2yrs I no longer was having gall bladder attacks. Ultrasounds confirmed incredible improvements, but they were slow. As for the crohn's symptoms.. I knew beyond a shadow of a doubt that I had either crohn's or UC long before diagnosis... I just knew... don't ask how. Intuition I guess.. but left without a formal diagnosis I could not get proper treatment from a doctor so I had no choice but to take matters into my own hands and here is something shocking... The first thing I tried (because a family member talked me into it) was medical marijuana. I tried an edible form, and did it before bed when everyone else was asleep because I didn't know how it would affect me. I fell asleep and woke up 12-14 hrs later ( I hadn't had more that 30 minutes of strait sleep in 2yrs because of running to the bathroom), then when I woke up and saw daylight I panicked and checked to see if I had an embarrassing accident in my sleep, which I did not. I ran to the bathroom and had the first solid bowl movement in 2yrs, with very little blood or mucus at all. That day I had about 6 bowl movements instead of over 20. After about a week I was down to 4 bowl movements/day, very little if any blood and no visible mucus. The pain slowly got better over about a month's time and it has worked wonders, however there was one potentially dangerous downfall... I finally got a doctor to agree to a colonoscopy back in 2013 and afterwards he told me "You have obviously had some type of colitis, but it is gone now. There is no inflammation, but lots of strictures which are causing your symptoms" (the only symptom at that point was gas and bloating) and he sent me on my way feeling I didn't need treatment ( I didn't tell him I was using medical MJ because of the negative feelings so many have about it) so again I went without necessary treatment, probably because it worked so well to reduce inflammation. When I discontinue its use it takes anywhere from2 weeks to a month before I seriously flair up and am right back to running to the bathroom every 30-40 minutes, not sleeping, not being able to work or leave my home, even trying to sleep on the floor next to the bathroom. As far as dietary changes, they worked immediately to alleviate symptoms like gas, pain, and bloat, but I would not recommend my diet to anyone with these conditions because for some reason the things that help me hurt others and the diet that others typically follow for crohn's or colitis would practically kill me ( am a vegetarian, eat lots of raw fruit and veggies, and never get sick from them but meats, dairy and rice really do a number on me!). As far as other herbs like the turmeric, Boswellia Serrata, vitamin D, and aloe... I have just started these things recently so I can not offer much feedback there as far as how long until they take effect, and have yet to figure out how much of each is necessary. Since each person is so different in regards to triggers and response to different treatments I would imagine the outcome is very different for each individual. I believe that any one thing alone probably will have limited benefits, but a combination of prescription meds complimented by herbal remedies and lifestyle changes offers the best hope, and also being as active as possible is beneficial, as being physically active does help digestion in general and has been shown to reduce colon cancer risk. Trying out various alternative treatments and natural healing is something that they haven't studied much, so I consider it rather experimental at this point, but I am willing to experiment because after 37 years of suffering and not getting answers I figure I have nothing to lose but my colon... and it looks like that is gonna have to go sooner or later anyway, which could have been avoided had I been properly diagnosed and properly treated long ago before so much damage has been done. Although the situation I am in sucks I consider it a learning experience, and therefor am willing to try things to see if they work at all simply out of curiosity and because I have basically lost faith and trust in doctors after what I have been through. I just hope and wish these things may someday help others to avoid needless suffering, be more productive, and have a decent quality of life. I am sorry I cant really answer your question about how long different forms of alternative medicine takes to work, but it is definitely something to consider. Although there is huge individual differenced in the way each person responds to different treatments, I will keep those who are interested or curious informed about the outcome of the various alternatives I am trying (and since my doctor is still doing some diagnostic testing I have yet to start any prescription drugs/treatment, so any positive changes would have to come from the alternatives I am trying)... but keep in mind, I am not a doctor and these things shouldn't replace the treatment your doctor is recommending. Discuss them with your doctor as a complimentary treatment along with the traditional meds that you are being prescribed :)
Also, I have recently discontinues the medical MJ use because of the cost so we will see if all of the other things I have started doing will keep the typical full blown flair-ups I experience without it at bay.
 
hi zoeythecat,
thank you for sharing your experience. Really sorry to hear all that you had to go through without no mistake of yours. I wonder even after advances in medical field why diagnosis of crohn's is still a major concern. I suffered with stomach aliments for 4 years till 2012 when finally i was diagnosed with crohn's and right away underwent intestinal surgery. I was having a feel that i am the one who was diagnosed after a long period of suffering, but after reading your experience i feel i have been diagnosed early before much damage to my colon.
I definitely agree that every individual has his own symptoms and experiences. though the medical terminology for the disease is same, the kind of tolerance to food and medication is very different. Actually its surprising to know that you are able to tolerate raw vegetables which is very good to maintain your nutrient levels, I cannot tolerate them at all. I tolerate rice,boiled vegetables,meat broth well.
I have deferred a year from academics which gives me a lot of time to concentrate on my health. i am patiently taking alternative medications along with my regular meds after consulting my GI i hope the results shows my soon. Just hoping for the best.
Once again thank you very much for sharing your experience it was really helpful. I wish you get the right medical support :)
 
Hi all! I'm new to this thread. I had a synphcterotmy 8 weeks ago and I'm running a half in 2 months, I have been running here and there but not training yet. What's everyone's experience with running after surgerys?
 
Hello, training is my life.

I first started in the gym at secondary school with the other fat kid instead of standing at the side in PE and I even loved it then. I lost the weight and became quite fit. Had to leave uni due to really bad food poisoning, so I got qualified in Gym Instructing, Personal Training and Exercise Referral. The latter is what I want to do with my life.

Haven't been physically capable for ages now but hopefully if I can get some help we can come back stronger than ever.

I was wondering, if I may, if colostomy bags etc. have any impact on cycling and resistance training?

All my love
 
Hello Joey, I haven't got a stoma so I can't comment from personal experience, but there's a bloke in my cycling club who has one so I know it's possible! And check out this woman who has an ileostomy and is competing for GB as age group triathlete! http://www.sfh-tr.nhs.uk/index.php/component/content/article/8-communications/latest-news/1442-triathlete-dietitian-prepares-for-world-championships-after-life-changing-surgery

I've definitely seen stories about people achieving great things in weight training world who have a stoma as well.

My main issue has been perianal disease, which has been challenging at times to cycle, but in general I still manage to. I'm not doing so much at the moment due to another health problem, but I do what I can (Pilates and gentle cycling) and hope I will get back to training properly soon
 
Wow what a great read!
It's so reassuring because I'd worried that somewhat bouncing movements may have added too much pressure to support the bag.
For weightlifting the only potential problem I could see would be an work - I always have to go to the toilet halfway through my session and make sure to perform my ab work very shortly after so I don't accidentally wet myself (sorry if that's TMI) and also hardcore powerlifting like when people develop hernias. If that'd be a concern maybe use a belt for reassurance.

I'm glad to see your eagerness to return; we all have periods for whatever reason out of our control we're unable to train, but I strongly believe that having the right mindset is your greatest asset.

I remember after I sprained my ankle people were giving me dodgy looks. Like, even more than usual. Walking after breakfast and lunch, and training are part of my routine. The crutches were just annoying because stairs took twice as long to climb. Also shopping was a nightmare. On the plus side catapulting your bodyweight every time you take a step does wonders for the lat's. :)

Best of luck with your recovery, I'm sure you'll come back blazing
 
Inspired by all of you. I just got back from my first barre class after taking a break for a few weeks due to a flare.
Over the past couple months I had gotten into a pretty good routine of barre classes, stationary cycling at the gym, and some lifting. I was feeling really good...Like I was finally getting back into my body after years of feeling alienated from it because of this illness that made it feel like my body was my enemy, separate from myself. With this workout routine I was feeling more confident, strong, and grounded.
Then a few weeks ago my symptoms flared back up, and I didn't feel up for exercising..or doing much of anything. After a week or so of resting, I started going to restorative yoga classes...And today I went back to barre! I was a little nervous to go back after feeling so weak, and there were moments in class where I was frustrated that I did not feel as strong and capable as I did before the flare...But for the most part, I was surprised and happy about how strong I DID feel.
 
Can't wait to get out of this relapse and back to bicycling. I planned on riding Trail Ridge, 11,500 ft above seal level. There is a parallel fire road perfect for bicycles. From Estes Park to Grand Lake. A few days in Grand Lake playing and then back over the pass. I still want to do this in the late summer or fall. A long ways to go, either this summer or next, I have to keep this goal, I have to keep my sight on the future and not just on what I can't do now but what I will accomplish, without excuses.
 

cmack

Moderator
Staff member
That sounds like a heck of a fun trip. You have lots of fun to look forward to on that ride. Don't worry, you will ride that trail. I can already tell you will, just by your determination. I like your style. :)
 
First of all, I do not have Crohn's or IBS, but hoping to get some advice about fistulas, setons and cycling.

I have had a fistula for 5-6 years, periodic blockage, swelling and then drainage for 1-2 months followed by months symptom free.....then repeat. Over time the symptom free periods getting shorter, and periods of drainage and irritation getting longer.

Doc recommended 2 stage surgery with seton in place for 3-4 months followed by removal and closure (or something like that)? So far I have coped without surgery and put it off for 4+ years, but feel it is time to deal with it.

I am a cyclist, and have a cycling trip planned in September to Europe (60-100 km per day), and currently have surgery schedule to put in a seton in June which would mean it would be in place for my cycling trip. Other option is to delay surgery until after the cycling trip.....I have lived with it for 5-6 years so what's another 5-6 months?

If road cycling is manageable with a seton, I would prefer to get it done now and get on the road to recovery and eliminating the draining???

Thoughts, experiences, success stories or horror stories all welcome!
 

cmack

Moderator
Staff member
Setons and bikes didn't work for me. There may be new materials used now though, mine was like weed trimmer line. I would ask the doctors office, the receptionist may be able to ask the doctor a question for you. Good luck.
 
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